Great Bar Food at Home


 

Reviews

From Best of the Best: The Best Recipes from the 25 Best Cookbooks of 2007 by Food & Wine Magazine (July 2008)

"At restaurants, chefs are teaming up with mixologists to create delectable snacks to go with inventive drinks. This is the first good book dedicated to re-creating these dishes at home—perfect for anyone who likes throwing cocktail parties....The result is a fun, handy compilation of simple, irresistable snacks."

In addition to five recipes inside the book, a photo of Kate's recipe for "Bursting Tomato Gratin" from Great Bar Food At Home was featured on the back cover of The Best of the Best.

 
Great Bar Food At Home was a Finalist for the James Beard Foundation Book Award in the "Entertaining" Category (March 2008)
 
From New Jersey's Asbury Park Press (APP.com) (December 2007)

From the Stacks to the Stove

"Great Bar Food at Home" by Kate Heyhoe (Wiley; $17.95). With the cocktail craze in full force, what's a home host to do when having friends over for drinks? The recipes in this slender, thoughtful volume take care of all your nibbles-and-sips needs.

Copyright © 2007, Asbury Park Press. All Rights Reserved.

 
From Food & Wine Magazine (December 2007)

F&W Recommends: 6 Great Holiday Cookbooks

Inspired by the bar-food trend in restaurants, people are now interested in making the same kind of dishes at home. We are really keen on this cookbook. The recipes are spot-on and easy to make, like little corn-bread kisses (mini corn-bread muffins filled with goat cheese).
Perfect gift for: people who like to entertain during the holiday season.

Copyright © 2007, American Express Publishing. All Rights Reserved.

 

Food & Wine Magazine also selected Great Bar Food At Home for the 2008 edition of their hardcover book, Best of the Best: The Best Recipes from the 25 Best Cookbooks of the Year.

They will reprint four recipes from the book:

  • Chevre-Stuffed Cornbread Kisses
  • Bursting Tomato Gratin
  • Spanish Smoked Paprika Wings
  • Santa Fe-Caesar Crema
 
From the National Public Radio Holiday Book List (November 2007)

Bar Food, Hold the Bar
By Karen Grigsby Bates
Day to Day Correspondent

"Skip the crowds and make your own stylish nibbles at home. Kate Heyhoe, editor of the Web's first culinary e-zine, gives recipes for noshes that go with mixed drinks, beer and wines, along with the little plates' history. (For instance: Carpaccio, the paper-thin slices of raw beef that are now a restaurant standard, got its start, like the Bellini, at Harry's Bar, in Venice. The dish was named for the deep velvety red in Vittore Carpaccio's Renaissance paintings...) Now you can toss the chips and corn nuts and upgrade!"

Copyright © 2007, NPR. All Rights Reserved.

 
From Better Homes and Gardens Appetizers 2007 (print only)

"Peppered with interesting tales of speakeasies and Prohibition, the scoop on Hollywood haunts, and descriptions of French bistros and Spanish tapas bars, Great Bar Food at Home by Kate Heyhoe is a must read. It provides entertainment as well as great recipes for easy casual parties..."

Copyright © 2007, Meredith Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

 
From the Omaha World-Herald (November 14, 2007)

Cookbook Showcase
By Carol Zuegner
World-Herald Staff Writer

Tasty tidbits, both culinary and conversational, abound in "Great Bar Food at Home."

Kate Heyhoe's book is beautifully photographed, with recipes for mostly sophisticated bar food. Interspersed among the recipes is cocktail lore and conversational tidbits from what Heyhoe calls "timeless bars, historic hangouts and clubs with atmosphere."

In her introduction, Heyhoe writes that the book's inspiration came when she realized she now preferred to spend time with a few friends at home instead of barhopping or hosting big parties.

Her goal is to offer simple yet sophisticated fare that can be made ahead so the host can relax and enjoy the party as well. Heyhoe also offers tips on what kinds of snacks to pair with cocktails, wine and beer.

The cookbook starts out with Personal Caviar Tortes With Toast Points. It sounds a little daunting, but the tortes are made of cream cheese flavored with dill, garlic and lemon juice and formed into small rounds. Caviar is spooned on the top.

Some recipes offer a twist on more standard bar food: Salmon Sliders with Lime-Sesame Mayonnaise, for example, mimic the popular mini-burgers on many menus. The author suggests pairing Seeded Honey Crisps—a slightly sweet and salty cracker made from won ton wrappers—with Spicy Tunisian Sunset Dip, made from carrots seasoned with cumin, paprika and coriander.

For the conversational part of the book, she takes us from the Cafe Society of 1920s Europe and New York to 21, a New York speakeasy that features a hidden wine cellar, built to confound the federal agents during Prohibition, to Los Angeles bars made famous during the 1950s and 1960s.

Tidbits from Dorothy Parker, the famous acerbic-tongued writer of the 1920s, spice up the section on the Algonquin Round Table, a literary group that met at New York's Algonquin Hotel. A sample from a book review: "This is not a novel to be tossed aside lightly. It should be thrown with great force."

I tried gougère, basically a rich and easy cheese puff. Heyhoe suggests varying the cheese and flavoring, such as white cheddar and diced jalapeños, for a Southwestern twist.

Copyright © 2007, Omaha World-Herald. All Rights Reserved.

 
From the Texas Food and Wine Gourmet (November 13, 2007)

Kate Heyhoe, a Wimberley resident, and one of my favorite food writers, has written another excellent cookbook, Great Bar Food at Home. This is a very timely book for the approaching holiday season when you never have enough new, unique, and tasty party finger foods. Kate's little book contains recipes for over 50 tasty tidbits from all over the globe...(more)

Copyright © 2007, The Texas Food and Wine Gourmet. All Rights Reserved.

 
From the Los Angeles Daily News (October 24, 2007)

"Great Bar Food at Home," by Kate Heyhoe, is filled with delicious at-home bites to accompany a glass of wine, beer or classic cocktail. Interesting nibbles include Prosciutto-Mascarpone Pinwheels (yum!) Eggplant Pizzettes, Cognac Shrimp Wrapped in Bacon, Tangerine Yakitori, Santa Fe-Caesar Crema and much more. Ingredient lists are mostly short and doable for any cook. Now there's no excuse not to invite some friends over and celebrate the season.

Copyright © 2007, Los Angeles Newspaper Group. All rights reserved.

 
From the Texas Monthly (September 2007)

by Ashleigh Whaley

Life is too short to enjoy cocktail hour with a bag of Doritos. In Kate Heyhoe's new book Great Bar Food at Home, we learn that you can have a sophisticated bar atmosphere in the comfort of your own pad. You just have to plan. And Heyhoe is ready to help, highlighting nearly fifty easy-to-make recipes that bring flavor and life to the home bar.

Heyhoe begins with a brief lesson on pairing bar bites with cocktails, wine, and beer. The basic fundamentals leave room for personal taste, which will likely be discovered more fully after trying a few of Heyhoe's treats, such as Green Apple-Cucumber Matchsticks, Spanish Smoked Paprika Wings, and Cumin-Cheddar Coins. Every dish is designed to "elevate the act of imbibing a cocktail, a glass of wine, or a craft beer into a gratifying sensory event." The light meals and snacks require little preparation and are meant to be enjoyed by family and friends in a relaxing home environment.

Heyhoe, a native Texan, is the editor and co-founder of globalgourmet.com and the author of several cookbooks. She believes the home bar is the "social wave of the century," but pays her respects to bygone times by peppering her recipe collection with entertaining social tidbits about Café Society, "mixing the salad" at Studio 54, and the "gastropub" invasion, just to mention a few. In Great Bar Food at Home, Heyhoe makes a toast to the good life. Here are some bites to look forward to:

  • '21' Club's Crab Cakes with Cucumber-Ginger Salad
  • Lighter-than-Air Nori Squares
  • Saffron Queso Flameado
  • Authentic Garlic Fries
  • Teacup Tomato Toasts
  • Eggplant Pizzettes
  • Fig and Balsamic Pork Tenderloin on Walnut-Arugula Salad
  • Salmon Cassis

Copyright © 2007, Texas Monthly, Inc. An Emmis Communications company. All rights reserved.

 
From Publishers Weekly

Heyhoe is the founder and executive editor of GlobalGourmet.com, so it's no surprise that her latest creation has the look and feel of a Web site. As small and square as a Mac Mini, with brief text and large photos, the book offers knowledgeable tidbits on how to make 50 or so small bites, the kind that go down nicely with, say, a double martini or a Singapore Sling. Despite its contemporary design, the mood is often retro, in celebration of cocktail party cuisine. Upscale and old school, Heyhoe leads off with Personal Caviar Tortes with Toast Points and follows with Gougere, French cheese puffs made with Gruyère. From there, like any good global gourmet, she jet-sets across many an international boundary, visiting such diverse cuisines as Japanese (Rumaki with Soba Noodles) and North African (Spicy Tunisian Sunset Dip). For partygoers who prefer a cold Brooklyn lager over a Long Island iced tea, a chapter entitled Brewpub Nibbles and Noshes suggests such spice-fueled beer snacks as Cumin-Cheddar Coins and Smoky Chipotle Chili. Along the way, Heyhoe includes historical tidbits, such as the free-for-all that was Studio 54 and Austria's importance to Mexican beer. Dorothy Parker's cultural importance is crammed onto a single page, but plenty of her bon mots are quoted for anyone in need of breaking the ice. (Oct.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

 
  • Great Bar Food at Home
  • by Kate Heyhoe
  • John Wiley & Sons, Inc.
  • $17.95, 128 pages
  • ISBN-10: # 0471781835
  • ISBN-13: 978-0471781837
  • Information provided by the publisher.

Buy the Book

 
 

This page created September 2007, and modified December 2007


 

Great Bar Food

Buy the Book

Book Reviews

Kate Heyhoe

 

Gougere
Gougère, page 22

 

GBF Gift
and Party Ideas

Ideal travel
and gift size:

  • Carry it on-board, or mail—about 8-inches square

Craft a gift basket:

  • Add martini glasses and olives, or wine and cheese

Give to your hosts:

  • With or without wine, for dinners, parties & holidays

For a first date
at home:

  • Mix the drinks and dine in

Cheers to Newlyweds:

  • Ease into married life, enjoy bar food in your new home

Dress for cocktails:

  • Throw a bash with easy bites

Oscar Parties:

  • Eat like movie stars with caviar, crab cakes, and more

Deviled Eggs
Cocktail Onion'd
Deviled Eggs, page 30


 

The Book

Why I Wrote This Book
About the Book
Table of Contents
Index

 

Sample Recipes

Santa Fe-Caesar Crema

Santa Fe-Caesar Crema

Eggplant Pizzettes

'21' Crab Cakes

Cucumber Ginger Salad

 

Features

  • Nearly 50 recipes
  • 28 luscious photos
  • Hardcover, full color
  • Pairing guide: bar food & drink
  • Legendary tales & great bar lore
 

Outtakes
(Web Only)

Glamorous Garnishes
for Bar Food at Home

"Spiritual" Cooking
From Friars to Fruitcakes

Mignonette? Mais Oui!

 

Tasty Bytes

  • "A little bad taste is like a nice dash of paprika."
    —Dorothy Parker
  • Bemelmen's Bar has been called "a rumpus room for sophisticated adults."
  • Few bites appeal as much as melted cheese spooned into small tortillas...
  • Gastropubs Invade U.S.!
  • A bacaro swells at midday and early evening...
  • Food was never the attraction at Studio 54, for the cocaine-sniffing clientele...
  • Café Society didn't end with Repeal. It simply staggered into the daylight...
  • Lusty Spanish smoked paprika will change your life...

Salmon Sliders
Salmon Sliders, page 40